Repair Bay

By on 25 January 2013

The Repair Bay is a full-color, 48 x 30 inch, floor plan of a scifi repair bay, with Hex, Square and No overlay.

This Product includes the VTT files for online play.

Now includes a 360° View of the map.

Game Masters need quality maps for their miniatures. DramaScape™ is committed to bringing Game Masters the maps they need.

“We found this machine floating in the debris field. It’s of a highly advanced technology that we’ve never encountered before. Do you think its possible to analyze and repair it?”

The Repair Bay is a single map featuring a large repair bay with a small diagnostic room.

The Repair Bay is meant to be used in near or far future science games, but could be adapted as a cutting edge high tech repair facility in a modern setting. The repair bay would also make an excellent cargo bay as well for a spaceship, space station, or star port or even a room in a modern industrial facility or warehouse.

One module involving the Repair Bay starts with a cargo freighter hauling back a strange machine. A combination of metal and crystal it is quite unlike anything the crew of the cargo freighter has ever seen. They haul it into a star port or space station and bring it to the repair bay for a sensor scan and possible repair. The engineering crew’s initial scan determines that the metal and crystal needed to repair the machine are elements they have never encountered. The cargo freighter is ordered to turn over any minerals they recovered in their salvage operation. The space station attempts to communicate with the crew of the cargo freighter, but get nothing but static.

The Player Characters and a security team are sent in to investigate the cargo freighter. About halfway there, the alarm klaxons sound with lights blinking red, and the bridge relays that the docking area 1 has been sealed to prevent the entire ship from decompression. When they arrive, they find the emergency airlocks clamped down and the docking area sealed. The cargo freighter has a massive tear in the side, as if something cut it apart from the inside. The docking area shows signs of similar damage. Tracks have been cut into the corridors of the station that look like claw prints. They lead to the repair bay. Once at the repair bay, the player characters see a horrifying sight. Creatures of metal and crystal are incorporating machines, mechs, and other drones, growing and expanding. For some reason, they shun bonding with the machine brought back by the crew to the repair bay, but are definitely trying to form a wall of metal around the machine. Its up to the Player Characters to somehow stop these creatures and save the repair bay and likely the entire space station or star port from complete synchronization with the creatures. If the defeat the creatures, they can use any remaining minerals to repair the machine. Once the machine is repaired it whirrs to life, giving a robotic warning about the dangers of the silicon-based life forms in the asteroid field that bond with machines. It then goes about absorbing all of the remaining materials nearby whose origins were from within the asteroid belt if allowed to do so. It tells them that he is made from the same materials as the creatures, the reason they cannot take over him unlike the other machines. The machine requests to be repaired fully (its propulsion systems are down, which caused it to shut down in the field) and then brought back to the asteroid field to continue his vigilance.

About Dave McAlister

Dave has been roleplaying for over 30 years, having played and/or run most mainstream systems with the espionage genre being an early favourite. So much so that, in 1999, he started Modus Operandi. That same year he joined the Sarbreenar “Living” campaign team as their plotline controller before moving across to the Living Spycraft campaign team (as UK Regional Branch Director) in 2003. 2003 also saw the birth of UK Role Players as well as Dave’s first freelance writing appointment (co-writing World Militaries and consulting on both US Militaries and Battlegrounds, all for Spycraft).

Since then, Dave has concentrated on supporting the UK gaming scene. He has organised and run several small, one-day, events and was the RPG Area Manager for Gen Con UK in 2004. His current favourite systems are Dungeons & Dragons (specifically 5th Edition), Savage Worlds and Cinematic Unisystem. He has a (currently neglected) blog at dave.mcalister.org.uk and runs a D&D 5e SRD website at DnD5e.info.

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