Supplement 14: Space Stations

By on 16 May 2014

Smaller than planets, often larger than capital ships, space stations are a key part of any system’s military, economic and social construct. Indeed, in some systems the majority of the local population may be housed on stations with only a few making their lives on planets and moons in the area. Either way, stations are almost universally present in any system able to build them.

The core of this book is focused on the design and construction of space stations. New power-plants and grav drives provide the much less intensive needs of a space station, while new hull forms allow for cheaper structures to be built without the anti-gravity plating normally mounted within every ship. Facilities enable space stations to take part in local, inter-planetary and interstellar production and trade, to become population centres, install shopping districts and construct their own starships for sale or personal use.

Further chapters give more detail to station facilities and how they function, as well as offering new docking options for larger spacecraft and even capital ships. Stations can be the home ports of entire fleets, and without sufficient docking and recreation space, a fleet will soon fall apart.

This book covers a wide variety of types of station, and also the running of a station, involving building, staffing and setting up the imports that will be its life blood. You will read about the continued running of a station and the end result; profits. Finally, you will discover adventure hooks, setting suggestions and example stations to populate your Traveller universe with.

About Dave McAlister

Dave has been roleplaying for over 30 years, having played and/or run most mainstream systems with the espionage genre being an early favourite. So much so that, in 1999, he started Modus Operandi. That same year he joined the Sarbreenar “Living” campaign team as their plotline controller before moving across to the Living Spycraft campaign team (as UK Regional Branch Director) in 2003. 2003 also saw the birth of UK Role Players as well as Dave’s first freelance writing appointment (co-writing World Militaries and consulting on both US Militaries and Battlegrounds, all for Spycraft).

Since then, Dave has concentrated on supporting the UK gaming scene. He has organised and run several small, one-day, events and was the RPG Area Manager for Gen Con UK in 2004. His current favourite systems are Dungeons & Dragons (specifically 5th Edition), Savage Worlds and Cinematic Unisystem. He has a (currently neglected) blog at dave.mcalister.org.uk and runs a D&D 5e SRD website at DnD5e.info.

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