The Tomb of Soloman

By on 8 November 2013

Legend holds that Solomon, son of David and king of the Jews, had in his possession a magical ring that gave him power over demons and spirits. He imprisoned these spirits and sealed them away forever, so they would trouble humanity no more – and every word of this legend is true.

King Solomon was indeed a mighty sorcerer and he mastered a spell of binding that could contain even the most powerful spirit. He travelled the length and breadth of Judea, ridding the land of spirits and demons. Some he forced to serve him, others he demanded knowledge from but the greater part of these he imprisoned for all eternity in a trap-filled dungeon, the Tomb of Solomon.

Today, the tomb is lost beneath the deserts of Syria – and this is a blessing for mankind, for if the tomb were to be found, the greed of men would surely lead to them loosing the demons of Solomon on the world. As the wise king learned at great cost, power corrupts.

You can buy this product from DriveThruRPG/RPGNow.

About Dave McAlister

Dave has been roleplaying for over 30 years, having played and/or run most mainstream systems with the espionage genre being an early favourite. So much so that, in 1999, he started Modus Operandi. That same year he joined the Sarbreenar "Living" campaign team as their plotline controller before moving across to the Living Spycraft campaign team (as UK Regional Branch Director) in 2003. 2003 also saw the birth of UK Role Players as well as Dave's first freelance writing appointment (co-writing World Militaries and consulting on both US Militaries and Battlegrounds, all for Spycraft). Since then, Dave has concentrated on supporting the UK gaming scene. He has organised and run several small, one-day, events and was the RPG Area Manager for Gen Con UK in 2004. His current favourite systems are Dungeons & Dragons (specifically 5th Edition), Savage Worlds and Cinematic Unisystem. He has a (currently neglected) blog at dave.mcalister.org.uk and runs a D&D 5e SRD website at DnD5e.info.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Why ask?

%d bloggers like this:

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close